Animal science prof serves students

Kerns provides pet care at a discounted rate

By Jacob King
@jking82295

It’s no secret that taking an animal to a veterinarian is a costly experience. However, one UF professor is assisting The University of Findlay community with discounted animal services.

Michael Kerns, professor of animal science and staff veterinarian, has been offering services to the animals of UF faculty, staff, and students for many years.

“It started from just wanting to help students,” said Kerns. “We do this small animal clinic for the University family.”

Although originating from the desire to help students tend to their animals, it expanded with the support of other faculty and staff.

“It was just a service thing I wanted to offer to people and it grew from that,” said Kerns.

Because of the service’s success, a set schedule was put in place to treat animals and stay consistent with check-ups.

Kearns goes to the animal science barn every Friday night to tend to the animal’s needs, but it’s not just him alone running this service. He involves animal science, pre-vet students and TAs in order to give them real-world experience.

“It’s a lot to ask of the students because they have to give up their Friday nights and don’t get paid for that,” said Kerns.

Although giving up weekend nights isn’t ideal, students aiding with Kerns don’t mind the loss and find the benefits outweigh the detractions.

“It’s beneficial to students because he actually teaches students,” said MJ Foletta, senior pre-vet major. “It can be a learning experience if you want it to be.”

Foletta said how Kerns will allow students who aren’t directly participating in the treatments to stand by, observe, and gain a visual experience.

“You can also do an internship through him,” said Foletta.

Kerns offers and conducts much of the same services/procedures as a regular vet clinic, which is one of the strongest appeals to those who seek the assistance.

“We administer vaccines, trim their nails, give those medical exams, clean their ears out, check their ears out for infections, and clean wounds,” said Kerns.

However, Kerns will not provide a service to an animal that is out of his reach and requires more resources than he can provide.

“If we see a larger problem we will tell them ‘hey, you may need to go to a bigger clinic,’” said Kerns.

In addition to providing help to the UF community, a larger appeal to these services is the discounted cost.

Kerns makes the assistance feasible to students by charging a cheaper rate than regular vets, thus allowing access for a large amount of people.

“I heard his prices were reasonable for college students,” said Rachel Nehls, junior nursing major. “I’ve gone to other vets and it is for sure saving you money.”

The way Kerns is able to help the UF community at a reasonable price is by charging clients the cost of the vaccine or medicine, instead of charging more to make a profit.

“I wanted to do something, I wanted to be helpful but I didn’t want to lose money,” said Kerns. “Very little stuff is charged out.”

This inexpensive service for animals has helped many with their pets, especially students.

“No, I probably wouldn’t have been able to afford another vet,” said Nehls.It’s no secret that taking an animal to a veterinarian is a costly experience. However, one UF professor is assisting The University of Findlay community with discounted animal services.

Michael Kerns, professor of animal science and staff veterinarian, has been offering services to the animals of UF faculty, staff, and students for many years.

“It started from just wanting to help students,” said Kerns. “We do this small animal clinic for the University family.”

Although originating from the desire to help students tend to their animals, it expanded with the support of other faculty and staff.

“It was just a service thing I wanted to offer to people and it grew from that,” said Kerns.

Because of the service’s success, a set schedule was put in place to treat animals and stay consistent with check-ups.

Kearns goes to the animal science barn every Friday night to tend to the animal’s needs, but it’s not just him alone running this service. He involves animal science, pre-vet students and TAs in order to give them real-world experience.

“It’s a lot to ask of the students because they have to give up their Friday nights and don’t get paid for that,” said Kerns.

Although giving up weekend nights isn’t ideal, students aiding with Kerns don’t mind the loss and find the benefits outweigh the detractions.

“It’s beneficial to students because he actually teaches students,” said MJ Foletta, senior pre-vet major. “It can be a learning experience if you want it to be.”

Foletta said how Kerns will allow students who aren’t directly participating in the treatments to stand by, observe, and gain a visual experience.

“You can also do an internship through him,” said Foletta.

Kerns offers and conducts much of the same services/procedures as a regular vet clinic, which is one of the strongest appeals to those who seek the assistance.

“We administer vaccines, trim their nails, give those medical exams, clean their ears out, check their ears out for infections, and clean wounds,” said Kerns.

However, Kerns will not provide a service to an animal that is out of his reach and requires more resources than he can provide.

“If we see a larger problem we will tell them ‘hey, you may need to go to a bigger clinic,’” said Kerns.

In addition to providing help to the UF community, a larger appeal to these services is the discounted cost.

Kerns makes the assistance feasible to students by charging a cheaper rate than regular vets, thus allowing access for a large amount of people.

“I heard his prices were reasonable for college students,” said Rachel Nehls, junior nursing major. “I’ve gone to other vets and it is for sure saving you money.”

The way Kerns is able to help the UF community at a reasonable price is by charging clients the cost of the vaccine or medicine, instead of charging more to make a profit.

“I wanted to do something, I wanted to be helpful but I didn’t want to lose money,” said Kerns. “Very little stuff is charged out.”

This inexpensive service for animals has helped many with their pets, especially students.

“No, I probably wouldn’t have been able to afford another vet,” said Nehls.

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