Leaves are falling and stress is calling

By Alana Sudermann

Email: sundermanna@findlay.edu

Twitter: @alana_sundy23

 

Stress and anxiety seem to peak for students towards the end of the semester. With exams and major projects coming up, students begin to feel overwhelmed.

According to the American College Health Association, one in every six college students will be treated for or diagnosed with anxiety over the course of their educational careers.

First year pharmacy students, Sam Oliver and Katelyn Kolkemeyer, know how stressful the semester can be especially when it comes to the end of the semester.

“Every time an exam comes around, that’s when I’m the most stressed and the most frantic about studying,” said Oliver. “But I’m sure finals will be very overwhelming.”

 For Kokemeyer, stress seems to come in waves.

“Every time an exam is coming up that is kind of when I get the most stressed it’s not like on particular point of the year. It’s like multiple points of the year,” said Kolkemeyer.  

In stressful times, the University of Findlay has many resources for students. Advisors on campus offer more than just help scheduling your classes. Department Chair of Communication, Diana Montague, Ph.D., has been helping students through the pressures of college for several years.

“Try to get some physical exercise to just blow off some of the anxiety and steam, even if it is just for ten minutes.  Also, try to lay out everything that is upcoming and due and try to make yourself a to-do list on your calendar,” said Montague. “I think if people break down the tasks that they need to do to accomplish something bigger, they can see the steps that get them there, they can feel accomplished and that in and of itself can give you more energy to get to the next step”

Breaking down tasks and organizing a schedule is just one of the many tools Montague suggests students should use when feeling overwhelmed in classes. Certain places on campus also can provide information and help to students who need it such as the Oiler Success Center or the Counseling Center. Montague suggests that even having someone to talk to may help reduce some of those over whelming feelings.  

“I would recommend multiple people to talk to, certainly your academic adviser, that is one of the reasons why we are here. Go to the Oiler Success Center, there are people to chat with in there. The Counseling Center has great folks to chat with over there,” said Montague. “Sometimes even just chatting with a roommate or a friend or a teammate and seeing that other people are in the same position can give you a boost.”

Talking about overwhelming feelings may feel intimidating especially to someone new. Jodi Firsdon, a licensed professional counselor at the University ensures a safe environment for students to come and talk if needed.

“The counselors here are all licensed professional counselors through the state of Ohio, so that means we are required to keep confidentiality,” said Firsdon.

Counseling Services do a lot more than just providing a place to talk. There are multiple tools and information they provide to ensure the wellbeing of students.

“We do also have the TAO app that is free this year for any University student that has a University of Findlay email address. And that is something you can go through different modules and there are several that are geared towards just anxiety, depression or whatever you may need. It is all on there,” said Firsdon. “Then there is even a meditation and relaxation library that’s on there and takes you through some of those guided meditations.”

Being a student in any program brings challenging and stressful times. Kolkemeyer makes sure to stay grounded.

“I’m not taking the full eighteen credits, but it is still pretty stressful only because I put a lot of pressure on myself to do well,” said Kolkemeyer.

 

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