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UFTV steps up to bring GMAC Track and Field to the masses

UFTV steps up to bring GMAC Track and Field to the masses

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by February 12, 2019 Around Campus

By Pulse Staff

The University of Findlay will host the GMAC Track and Field Championships at the FRC on Feb. 22 and 23. Thirteen GMAC schools are scheduled to participate.

The event is a huge production for the UF Athletic Department and an exciting opportunity for the Oiler athletes. But what some may not realize is the production going on behind the scenes as UFTV works to video and air the contest on Stretch TV.

AJ DuFresne, UFTV Manager and adjunct professor in the Communication Department, is charged with producing about 16 to 17 hours of the championship with three to four hours of prep work and set up. The coverage will be non-stop with a few Public Service Announcements per hour.

The nature of this GMAC league event makes it high profile to all universities and their student athletes, parents and alumni, according to DuFresne.

In 2017 UFTV aired the GLIAC track championship before it switched to the GMAC league.

“It was the most viewed event we had produced up to that point,” said DuFresne. “We expect to have thousands watching our live stream each day, with Saturday (finals) to be the big draw.”

Grant Goetcheus is a senior at UF and the president of the UFTV production club. He was involved in that program as well.

“It’s a big production like commencement,” said Goetcheus. “It takes everyone to make sure that it is a quality production.”
DuFresne says he will need 12 to 15 students to pull off the production. They will use three to four High Definition cameras to live stream the even on the UFTV YouTube channel. He still has a few openings available if any students want to get involved. Workers will be paid and receive free Domino’s pizza as well as have the opportunity to help UFTV and UF athletics.

“This year we need people to create social media on behalf of FMN, Pulse, and UFTV,” said DuFresne. “(We) always want more students to be involved.”

“It is a valuable experience for students,” said Goetcheus. “It has deadlines and pressure that isn’t experienced in the normal school activities.  It challenges student to try something new and do more.”

 

 

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